You Were Never Really Here 123movies – Watch You Were Never Really Here online free

Watch You Were Never Really Here online free – Quality cinema is hard to find. You can usually sniff it from the opening titles and in this instance that is very true. Exceptional writing, acting and art direction all combine to deliver a feast for the senses and take you on an absorbing emotional ride which sticks with you long after. The film has been compared to Taxi driver but it put me in mind of (the original) Get Carter. Phoenix’s performance holds the same gravity as that of Caine and the narrative is similar. There were moments of pure Tarantino style brilliance – (I’ve Been to paradise) and the choice soundtrack was obviously carefully thought about. Highly recommend if you can deal with the violence.

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You Were Never Really Here 123movies – Watch You Were Never Really Here online free

You Were Never Really Here review by Ruben Mooijman – Taxi Driver revisited

It’s hard to review this film without mentioning ‘Taxi Driver’. Both films are about disillusioned war veterans, moving through the urban jungle, loathing the decadence of modern society, and rescuing a young girl from a brothel. Also, both films feature an aspiring politician during an election campaign. It’s simply impossible to ignore so many similarities. But it’s extremely difficult, not to say impossible, to make a film that can stand up to the iconic Scorsese classic.

Joe, a silent war veteran played by Joaquin Phoenix, specializes in difficult operations like rescuing young girls who have run into trouble. So he doesn’t hesitate when an influential politician asks him to search for his daughter. The man doesn’t want to involve the police, because he fears for his reputation.

Finding the girl turns out to be remarkably simple. But after having saved her by violently eliminating everyone standing in the way, things go wrong. There is more violence, more blood and more killing. In the end, Joe seems to emerge victoriously, but there is nothing to be happy about. ‘Where do you want to go?’, he asks the saved girl. ‘I don’t know’, she says. ‘I don’t know either’, is the desperate sounding answer.

Lynn Ramsay explains Joe’s state of mind by inserting lots of short flashes, sometimes almost subliminal. It adds to the general mood of darkness and looming danger. All kinds of unpleasant things are going on, but Joe nor the viewer know exactly what. The only way to deal with it, is with ruthless violence.

But is this one man rescue mission enough to carry a whole film? I have my doubts. The first time Joe rescues the girl, the action is filmed in a very original way. We see everything happening through the images of the surveillance cameras in the building. This is exciting cinema. But at the end, Joe is filmed in a conventional way while slowly moving through a large villa, suspecting danger around every corner. This is a scene like so many similar scenes from other movies.

After leaving the cinema, I felt I had seen a bit too much violence and too little storytelling. But without doubt, this is a personal feeling: perhaps the lack of story elements is what makes this film stand out from others.

You Were Never Really Here review by danren121 – You were never really here. Yeah, that’d would’ve saved a fiver.

This film may draw some crass and unwarranted comparisons with Taxi Driver, but very much in the spirit of a review of this film in the Time’s newspaper which lauded much praise, this isn’t that movie. This is a film that intends to be substantial without actually having much substance so in some respect it is quite contemporary. The protagonist walks around with a hammer hurting bad people. Of course theres way more to it than that, but is there really? On an aesthetic level this is a picture that easily holds its own and some, the ponderous direction doesn’t quite become pretentious and there is a coherent aesthetic. Yet the film’s reception doesn’t seem fair considering what is on offer. The telegraph called it a film that will blow you a way, yeah, one slow shot at a time.

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You Were Never Really Here review by The Movie Diorama – You Were Never Really Here, simply put, is a stunning piece of cinema.

Warning: this review will excessively use the adjective “phenomenal”. Phenomenal. Absolutely phenomenal. Phenomenally directed, acted and written. This phenomenal indie thriller will leave you breathless. An incredibly rare achievement to leave me hypnotised long after the credits roll, but Lynne Ramsay’s latest intrusive yet intimate character study did that and then some. Centralising on Joe, a war veteran suffering from PTSD, who accepts a job to retrieve a politician’s kidnapped daughter from a brothel. However in doing so, he risks the safety of his mother and his own life. This showcases Ramsay’s supremely defiant directing style. Every scene, every camera movement and every little detail is a finely tuned mechanism to a large machine. The entire picture exudes confidence, such bold directing choices that elevates this above other indie titles. The visceral violence and bleak events that occur create several thrilling moments, but the palpable tension is illustrated through the character of Joe. A damaged man addicted to pain killers to deal with his hallucinogenic illusions that tamper with his sanity. Ramsay’s screenplay never belittles him into an unlikeable state, the behests he accepts actually retains his humanity whilst portraying the excessive violence. All phenomenally played by Joaquin Phoenix who many consider to be one of the best actors working today. With this, I completely agree. Dialogue is kept to a minimum yet the amount of expression just from his face and body language was phenomenal. Jonny Greenwood’s unsettling and intrusive score only adds to the heightened state of mind that the narrative conveys. Just utterly enthralling. My eyes never left the screen once. The ambiguous ending was the icing on the cake, solidifying its indie origins. Beautiful and horrific simultaneously. A perfect juxtaposition that illustrates the themes and technical talent conveyed through this phenomenal film. It gets the second perfect rating of the year. Cannot recommend this enough.

You Were Never Really Here review by Lasttimeisaw – You were never really here and I’ve never been to me, either!

Fourth feature from the button-pushing Lynne Ramsay, YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE pits Joaquin Phoenix’s emotionally blocked veteran Joe against a sordid child prostitution ring, meanwhile he is also seeking an outlet from the besetting trauma of his checkered past.

It is a gut-wrenching story on paper, but Ramsay configures sundry conceits to present a “reductive” diorama of the events, and the most prominent one is the viewpoint, which never deflects from Joe, hence signifies that there will be no lengthy flashback sequences to inform us what he has experienced (as a child, a soldier, etc.), only through the transient fragments of memory incessantly penetrating into Joe’s heads, audience can piece it together proximately, but never the full picture, because for once, we don’t need to know it, what is at stake here is its traumatic after effect.

Secondly, Lamsay flags up a bloated/beefed-up Phoenix’s body metamorphosis, which brings about the corporeal testimony of what he has been suffering from, transferred through Ramsay’s hyper-real observation (scars, bruise, etc.). Joe’s knee-jerking coping mechanism towards the bane is self-suffocation, a leitmotif repeatedly wielded to induce our own gasping response, resounds hauntingly with the self-initiated count-down of Nina (Samsonov), the girl whom Joe is hellbent on rescuing from her pedophiliac abusers. Phoenix won BEST ACTOR is Cannes (along with Ramsay’s script win), deservedly, his performance is arrestingly measured, profoundly unaffected but deeply affecting, because he invites us to care for Joe, a laconic, middle-aged, mom’s boy, a damaged good whose weapon of choice is a hammer, he makes good as a brutal enforcer, using violence to repress his disturbed state, which is caused by violence/abuse itself, it is a vicious circle he cannot outrun, and we can pour out our sympathy to him when a bereft Joe decides to end his life in the lake (with the sublimely beauteous underwater stillness) before thinks better of it or near the denouement, a startled figment of his imagination prompts a perversely comical/shocking combo.

Last but not the least, it is about how Ramsay choose to present its action of brutality, and she ingeniously points up its “aftermath” instead of showing the actual execution (during his first rescuing attempt inside a high-end New York apartment building, Joe’s action is entirely captured by the fuzzy security camera), violence itself is ephemeral, what lingers behind is its aftermath, tangible, grisly and immutable. When Joe finally loses it after seeing what Nina has done (a big letdown to fans of Alessandro Nivola though), it is a scathing brickbat towards the state of affairs without the help of conventional verbosity, and inaugurates Joe’s mental ablutions of his own existence.

In the event, Ramsay’s clean-cut, existential thriller owns to a lucid consciousness of its sensitive material, brilliant aptitude in its visual and sound literacy, also the film allows humor (a sprightly Judith Roberts as Joe’s dotage-afflicted mother, sharing meta-PSYCHO joke in communion), and psychic vision (that moment when Joe realizes who is the culprit in his mind-scape) into the play, the main takeaway for me is the unexpected tendresse between Joe and a hit-man he has mortally injured (Price), lying together on the floor, humming along Charlene’s ’80s one-hit-wonder I’VE NEVER BEEN TO ME on the radio, and holding their hands, is the song really the answer to the film’s English title? You were never really here and I’ve never been to me, either. Touché!

You Were Never Really Here review by Pjtaylor-96-138044 – Dark, intense and immensely gripping; as discreet as it is devastating.

‘You Were Never Really Here (2018)’ is a dark, disturbing but discreet piece, one that’s as off-kilter and uncomfortable as it is subdued. It’s this remarkable restraint that allows its undercurrent of explosive violence, seedy deviance and childhood traumas to be all the more shocking and genuinely effecting when they erupt from the relative calm on the screen. It’s an amazingly atmospheric and difficult watch that doesn’t hold your hand, so that if you aren’t always fully engaged then you may not wholly grasp the almost exposition-less plot. The explicit, brutally jarring flashes of a past narrative paint a picture of an incredibly wholistic implicit story, without filling in every blank, in an incredibly gripping way, leaving you to wallow in the head of a severely damaged individual and think about the experience for long after the credits have rolled.

You Were Never Really Here review by Jeckr – A film nerd’s thriller

It’s easy to parrot the same rote phrases about gritty thrillers like “a visceral gut punch”, but it’s hard to describe You Were Never Really Here in any other way.

The various components that make up the whole are all fantastic individually. Phoenix’s and Samsonov’s performances are spellbinding, Greenwood continues his streak of stupendous scores, and the editing is so strong that the film probably wouldn’t work with a lesser effort. The cinematography is excellent as well, providing several shots that work incredibly even just as stills.

The character writing is superb and, along with the violent set-pieces, form the meat of the film. If you enjoy Nicolas Winding-Refn, you’ll like this film quite a bit. However where I find his screenwriting to be a bit lackluster at times, this film survives on the strength of its character writing.

This is a film nerd’s thriller. Be prepared for slower pacing and gratuitous violence.

You Were Never Really Here review by Ignacy98 – Best thriller since Drive

This film is taking some parts frome movies like “Leon” and “Taxi Driver”, but its 100% fresh. Ramsay made great thriller with great character played by the master Joaquin Phoenix. His character is full of difrent emotions. We are studying Joe’s life during the movie.

Movie starts slowly, Joe is in work, meaning dirty job like beating up some people or saving people from the bud guys hands. We are following his steps and watching how the life of veteran with painfull past is going. Is there any chance for Joe to make his life better? Maybe.

Movie is full of violence but it’s not only about it, for me the movie is about carrying on the life we don’t like, but if we don’t want to do anything for our selves, we always can do it for the other people, Joe picks option number two, save the little girl.

After movie when I went out of the cinema I was wondering about this movie for a long time. For me it’s best thriller movie since Drive or even Se7en (but not better). If somebody is wondering about going for this title to the cinema I will tell you it’s worth this kind of money. Instant classic maybe with great performance of Joaquin Phoenix.

You Were Never Really Here review by David Ferguson – Brutal and wonderful

Greetings again from the darkness. Scottish director Lynne Ramsay doesn’t shy away from tough material. In fact, she seems to thrive on it. Following the emotional turmoil of WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN (2011) she delivers her latest, which can best be described as brutal. The brutality here is not the on screen violence – we get mostly the aftermath or only see the ‘edges’ of terrible deeds. No, the brutality here is in a world that needs a man like Joe.

Joaquin Phoenix plays Joe, a former military man who lives with his mother. Joe has a particular set of skills that fit into the narrow career niche of rescuing kidnapped girls and ridding society of their captors. Rather than a hired gun, Joe is a hired hammer … ballpeen hammer being his sentimental and strategic weapon of choice. Joe is also a bit mentally unstable, likely suicidal, and haunted by inner demons. Yet he is also patient and kind with his elderly mother (Judith Roberts).

Joe’s most recent job is to find and rescue a State Senator’s daughter (Ekaterina Samsonov) from an underground sex ring run by some powerful political types. The job is a success right up until it isn’t. It’s at this point when Joe finds a reason to live … vengeance. It’s also when Mr. Phoenix becomes a legitimate contender for an Oscar nomination. His hulk of a man with a lumbering gait experiences and dozens of body scars. He has these flashbacks which are so short spurts, at times they feel like mere teases. Soon enough we assemble the pieces to know the baggage from a traumatic childhood event, and the front lines of a horrific war, have created this shell of a man with his own set of principles.

John Doman and Alessandro Nivola have minor supporting roles, but this one rides on the battered and no longer symmetrical shoulders of Joaquin Phoenix, and the creative stylings of filmmaker Lynne Ramsay. It is imagery combined with performance and the result is spellbinding. If you can handle it, the film provides a cinematic journey to depths not typically reached.

Best not to fill in many of the film’s specifics, but the comparisons to TAXI DRIVER are apropos. I found myself wondering if Paul Schrader was consulted in the adaptation of Jonathan Ames’ source material book. The city streets and dank hotel rooms scream gritty 1970’s thriller, and the recurring shots of plastic bags over the head emphasize the claustrophobia Joe experiences. This is doubtless meant to be commentary on politicians and the corrupt power they wield, but it works less as that and more as a glimpse at one man’s darkness. Add to that the pulsating score from Jonny Greenwood, and the creepy use of “My Angel Baby” by Rosie and Originals, and only one word can describe Ms. Ramsay’s film … brutal.

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